Unable to connect to database - 04:31:55 Unable to connect to database - 04:31:55 SQL Statement is null or not a SELECT - 04:31:55 SQL Statement is null or not a DELETE - 04:31:55 Botany & Plant Biology 2007 - Abstract Search
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Abstract Detail


Cell-to-Cell and Long Distance Signaling

Chevalier, David [1], Morris, Erin [2], Walker, John [1].

DAWDLE, a forkhead-associated domain gene, regulates multiple aspects of plant development.

Phosphoprotein-binding domains are found in many different proteins and specify protein-protein interactions critical for signal transduction pathways. Fork-head associated (FHA) domains bind phosphothreonine containing peptides and control many aspects of cell proliferation in yeast and animal cells. The Arabidopsis thaliana protein, Kinase Associated Protein Phosphatase includes a FHA domain that mediates interactions with receptor-like kinases, which in turn regulate a variety of signaling pathways involved plant growth and pathogen responses. Screens for insertional mutations in other Arabidopsis FHA domain containing genes identified a mutant with pleiotropic defects. dawdle (ddl) plants are developmentally delayed, produce defective roots, shoots, flowers, and have reduced seed set. DDL is expressed in the root and shoot meristems and the reduced size of the root apical meristem in ddl plants suggest a role early in organ development.


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1 - University of Missouri-Columbia, Division of Biological Sciences, 304 Life Science Center, Columbia, Missouri, 65211, USA
2 - Monmouth College, Biology Department, 700 E. Broadway, Monmouth, Il, 61462, USA

Keywords:
Arabidopsis thaliana
FHA domain
development
Phosphorylation.

Presentation Type: Plant Biology Abstract
Session: P
Location: Exhibit Hall (Northeast, Southwest & Southeast)/Hilton
Date: Sunday, July 8th, 2007
Time: 8:00 AM
Number: P34010
Abstract ID:970


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