Unable to connect to database - 07:55:26 Unable to connect to database - 07:55:26 SQL Statement is null or not a SELECT - 07:55:26 SQL Statement is null or not a DELETE - 07:55:26 Botany & Plant Biology 2007 - Abstract Search
Unable to connect to database - 07:55:26 Unable to connect to database - 07:55:26 SQL Statement is null or not a SELECT - 07:55:26

Abstract Detail


Phytochemical Section

Onyemachi, Felix C [1].

Self-Defense Strategies in Plants.

Like all living things, plants live in a potentially hostile world. From the moment of germination on, they must compete with other plants for space, light, water, and mineral nutrients. As young, tender seedlings, they are prone to attack by bacteria, fungi, insects, nematodes, and a host of other predators. By the time they have grown, they face not only their old enemies, but also herbivorous animals of various kinds. Survival to completion of life cycle requires the evolution of defense mechanisms to avoid or ward off pests and predators. Plants have evolved many different strategies to cope with the depredations of pathogenic organisms. Some plants contain pre-existing compounds which affect the damage-causing organisms. Other chemicals may be synthesized after an infection has started which inhibit pathogenic activity. Even growth patterns may help a plant defend itself against infection. Some plants are carefully avoided by man and other animals because they are unpleasant to touch. Many of them have sharp thorns or prickles capable of inflicting painful wounds. Other plants possess poisonous hairs that produce irritating rashes.


Log in to add this item to your schedule

1 - university of the Gambia, Agricultural and Biological Sciences, P.o.Box 3530, P.box.3530, Banjul, Banjul, 00220, The GAMBIA

Keywords:
I U X2 X2.

Presentation Type: Oral Paper:Papers for Sections
Session: CP60
Location: Williford C/Hilton
Date: Wednesday, July 11th, 2007
Time: 3:30 PM
Number: CP60001
Abstract ID:817


Copyright 2000-2007, Botanical Society of America. All rights