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Abstract Detail


Comparative Genomics, Development, Physiology and Systematics of the Brassicaceae and Cleomaceae

Menke, Marck [1].

The Phylogeny and Evolution of Aethionema: Investigating the Earliest Extant Divergence in Brassicaceae.

Aethionema, in the tribe Aethionemeae, is the sister group to all other members of Brassicaceae, thereby forming one half of the family’s basal divergence. However the phylogenetics, evolution and taxonomy of this diverse genus of annuals and perennials native to the Mediterranean and Middle East has remained poorly known. Using sequence data from the chloroplast gene ndhF, we have generated a phylogenetic framework showing three main sublineages within Aethionema, each showing a subset of the genus' variation. Furthermore several species currently included in Aethionema, place within the distantly related tribe, Noccaeeae, while conversely recognition of the genus Moriera renders Aethionema paraphyletic. Insights into trait evolution and biogeography for the genus include a single origin of the annual habit and more than one geographic range expansion from the eastern to western Mediterranean. Furthermore this work suggests future directions for studying the origins of Brassicaceae and the relationship with its sister family, Cleomaceae.


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1 - Washington University, Department of Biology, Campus Box 1229, Saint Louis, Missouri, 63130, U.S.A.

Keywords:
Aethionema
Brassicaceae
phylogenetics.

Presentation Type: Symposium or Colloquium Presentation
Session: SY07
Location: Stevens 2/Hilton
Date: Monday, July 9th, 2007
Time: 2:30 PM
Number: SY07004
Abstract ID:77


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