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Abstract Detail


Biogeography

Dixon, Chris [1], Schoenswetter, Peter [1], Schneeweiss, Gerald M. [1].

Comparative phylogeography in the European high mountain plants Androsace sect. Aretia (Primulaceae).

Androsace is the second largest genus of Primulaceae with centres of species diversity in mountain ranges of central and eastern Asia and Europe. An ideal model system for comparative phylogeography is provided by the European endemic A. sect. Aretia, whose c. 20 species have similar floral syndromes and dispersal abilities, but different distributions ranging from wide distributions to narrow endemics and from continuous to disjunct (within and/or between major mountain ranges) distribution areas. Phylogeographic analyses using an extensive sampling over the whole distribution areas of all currently recognized species and subspecies and employing data from cpDNA seqúencing and AFLP fingerprinting reveal that range shifts (via vicariance and long distance dispersal) within and among major mountain ranges, partly involving hybridizations between species or between already differentiated intraspecific lineages, have played an important role in shaping the current distributions. The majority, if not all, of these range fluctuations took place in the Pleistocene, and their extent renders current distributions poor predictors of genetic patterns.


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1 - University of Vienna, Department of Biogeography, Rennweg 14, Vienna, Vienna, A-1030, Austria

Keywords:
comparative phylogeography
Androsace
high mountain ranges
AFLP
cpDNA sequencing.

Presentation Type: Oral Paper:Papers for Topics
Session: CP33
Location: Lake Michigan/Hilton
Date: Tuesday, July 10th, 2007
Time: 2:00 PM
Number: CP33005
Abstract ID:567


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