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Abstract Detail


Plant-Pathogen Interactions

Donze, Teresa [1], Basnayake, Veronica [2], Jensen, Ty [2], Davis, Amber [3], Qu, Feng [2], Twigg, Paul [3], Morris, T. Jack [2].

Genetic analysis of defense related genes in Arabidopsis infected with turnip crinkle virus.

The ability to understand how plants recognize viral pathogens and defend themselves against disease is essential for developing more resistant plants. Turnip crinkle virus (TCV) is a small, positive sense, RNA plant virus that has been well characterized and infects many plants including Arabidopsis. We have previously determined that TCV coat protein (CP) interacts with a member of the NAC family of transcription factors which we called TCV-interacting protein (TIP). Transient co-expression of TIP with TCV CP was shown to prevent its nuclear localization. The mutant virus, called R6A, has a single amino acid replacement in the N-terminal region of the CP which eliminated the interaction between TIP and viral CP in vitro and in vivo. Although the R6A mutant virus was fully replication competent, it failed to elicit the resistance response in the cultivar, Dijon-17 which has the resistance gene HRT. Moreover, the R6A mutant caused more severe symptoms in the susceptible cultivar, Columbia-0. In order to better understand the TIP function in the Arabidopsis defense response, quantitative real-time PCR was used to examine a select group of defense related genes that were found to be differentially expressed in previous microarray analysis that compared gene expression profiles of TCV and R6A infections. Transcripts levels of genes including WRKY transcription factors and NAC family genes were monitored over a time course in both inoculated and systemic leaves. These data suggest that the TIP protein functions as a negative regulator of anti-viral defense. This project was supported by NIH grant P20 RR016469 from the BRIN program of the National Center for Research Resources and DOE grant DE-FG02-04ER15531.


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1 - University of Nebraska - Lincoln, School of Biological Sciences, Beadle Center E233, Lincoln, NE, 68588-0666, USA
2 - University of Nebraska - Lincoln, School of Biological Sciences
3 - University of Nebraska - Kearney, Biology

Keywords:
plant-virus interaction
Turnip crinke virus
Arabidopsis thaliana
defense.

Presentation Type: Plant Biology Abstract
Session: P
Location: Exhibit Hall (Northeast, Southwest & Southeast)/Hilton
Date: Sunday, July 8th, 2007
Time: 8:00 AM
Number: P15020
Abstract ID:306


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