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Abstract Detail


Reproductive Development

Kim, Joonyup [1], Binder, Brad M. [2], Patterson, Sara E. [2].

Functional characterization of DAB4 in floral organ abscission and apical dominance.

Abscission has been recently recognized as both evolutionary and agriculturally important trait in the history of human beings. We have been characterizing novel delayed abscission mutants in Arabidopsis to understand cell separation processes in the plant. dab4-1 has recently been map-based cloned and is being characterized for its functions in plant development. From our previous study, DAB4 controls floral organ abscission, dehiscence, and meristem arrest. Distinctive from the coi1 mutant, dab4-1 possesses other developmental roles that have been overlooked. These include strong apical dominance and epinastic leaf growth that are unique to dab4-1. Genetic analysis revealed that this is due to WS-specific genetic modifier(s) in dab4-1. Preliminary hormone studies have led us to hypothesize that there is possible hormone cross-talk between jasmonic acid, ethylene, and other hormones. We are investigating these links as well as other possible interactions using microarray analysis and yeast two-hybrid assay.


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1 - University of Wisconsin-Madison, Horticulture, 1575 Linden Dr, Madison, WI, 53705, USA
2 - University of Wisconsin- Madison, Horticulture, 1575 Linden Dr., Madison, WI, 53706, USA

Keywords:
Abscission
apical dominance
Hormone signaling.

Presentation Type: Plant Biology Abstract
Session: P
Location: Exhibit Hall (Northeast, Southwest & Southeast)/Hilton
Date: Sunday, July 8th, 2007
Time: 8:00 AM
Number: P28009
Abstract ID:283


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