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Abstract Detail


Recent Topics Posters

Brzyski, Jessica [1], Culley, Theresa M. [2].

Development of Microsatellite Markers in the Rare Plant Spiraea virginiana (Rosaceae).

Genetic analyses are increasingly utilized to understand current population trends as well as to predict future survival and evolutionary potential. This is especially important when studying rare species because the amount of genetic diversity is generally related to the health of a population. Spiraea virginiana, a rhizomatous shrub in the Rosaceae, is known from only a handful of populations in the United States. This species has certain characteristics that promote rarity, such as having few populations that are of small size, ineffective dispersal, little genetic variability, and specialized niche requirements. In part because of human disturbance, S. virginiana is now listed as federally threatened. Spiraea virginiana is highly clonal; without any other method of reproduction observed. This perceived lack of sexual reproduction is potentially the most important biological limitation in the species. However, studies of the reproductive biology and genetics of this species are lacking. To address the scarcity of genetic studies, I have developed codominant microsatellite markers to analyze sample from 13 individual clumps of two populations along Scioto Brush Creek in Scioto County, Ohio. Microsatellite markers were developed using the protocol of Glenn and Schable (2003), which is a non-radioactive method that uses biotinylated probes and Dynabeads. At least four microsatellite markers were developed and found to be polymorphic, thus indicating that these markers may be useful in quantifying the genetic variability among and between populations. This ongoing study will provide the first comprehensive research of the genetic variability and breeding ecology of S. virginiana, thus providing broad conservation implications for this rare species.


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1 - University of Cincinnati, Department of Biological Sciences, 614 Rieveschl Hall, Cincinnati, OH, 45221, USA
2 - University of Cincinnati, Department of Biological Sciences, 614 Rieveschl Hall, Cincinnati, Ohio, 45221, USA

Keywords:
Microsatellites (SSRs)
population genetics
clonal reproduction.

Presentation Type: Recent Topics Poster
Session: P
Location: Exhibit Hall (Northeast, Southwest & Southeast)/Hilton
Date: Sunday, July 8th, 2007
Time: 8:00 AM
Number: P79040
Abstract ID:2712


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