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Abstract Detail


Photosynthesis(Carbon)

Goyal, Arun [1].

Dissolved inorganic carbon concentration mechanism in the chloroplasts of Dunaliella: Induction and suppression of LCI-45 and LCI-47.

Ambient level of CO2 in water or air is insufficient for rapid growth of green algae and plants; therefore to increase the rate of photosynthesis and to suppress photorespiration, mechanisms for concentrating inorganic carbon into the chloroplasts are present in algae and in some plants. A general working model for the CCM in unicellular green algae includes isoforms of carbonic anhydrase (CA), membrane associated active transporter(s) and P-type ATPase (both in the plasmalemma and the inner chloroplast envelope). Isoforms of CA have been well characterized, but the components of active DIC transporters are not. Two proteins (LCI-45 and LCI-47) that are involved in DIC-transport into the chloroplasts have been identified in a unicellular green algae Dunaliella tertiolecta. The new results indicate that a P-type ATPase and H+ pumping may be involved in the active transport of DIC at the chloroplast envelopes. Results will be presented for expression and suppression of LCI-45 and LCI-47 during transition of high-CO2 grown Dunaliella tertiolecta to air-levels of CO2 and air-grown algae to high-CO2.


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1 - Texas A& M University-Commerce, Department of Biological & Environmental Sciences, 2600 S Neal Street, Commerce, TX, 75428, USA

Keywords:
Carbon metabolism.

Presentation Type: Plant Biology Abstract
Session: P
Location: Exhibit Hall (Northeast, Southwest & Southeast)/Hilton
Date: Sunday, July 8th, 2007
Time: 8:00 AM
Number: P13018
Abstract ID:2694


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