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Abstract Detail


Systematics Section / ASPT

Clark, John L. [1].

The convergence of pouched corollas and resupinate flowers in the neotropical members of the Gesneriaceae.

The term hypocyrtoid is often used to describe corollas that are tubular and pouched with a constricted throat and a very narrow limb. Generic circumscriptions based on the presence of pouches (e.g., Hypocyrta) or the types of pouch (e.g., medial or apical) have resulted in the classification of polyphyletic genera in neotropical members of the Gesneriaceae. In one extreme case in the tribe Episcieae (23 genera and 800+ species), nearly all genera lack monophyly with the exception of monotypic or small genera (e.g., less than 5 species) because of the misinterpretation of the homology of floral features. In Gesneriaceae the pouch is usually on the ventral surface, but some taxa that are resupinate have the pouch on the dorsal surface. A total evidence analysis using molecular (nuclear and chloroplast) and morphological data will be presented for the neotropical Gesneriaceae with an emphasis on the tribe Episcieae. The results of this analysis will be used to interpret the evolution of pouched corollas and present a novel set of terms to describe different types of hypocyrtoid corollas in the New World members of the Gesneriaceae.


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1 - University of Alabama, Department of Biological Sciences, Box 870345, Tuscaloosa, AL, 35487, USA

Keywords:
Gesneriaceae
hypocyrtoid
Episcieae.

Presentation Type: Oral Paper:Papers for Sections
Session: CP29
Location: Stevens 2/Hilton
Date: Tuesday, July 10th, 2007
Time: 8:30 AM
Number: CP29001
Abstract ID:2007


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