Unable to connect to database - 06:34:43 Unable to connect to database - 06:34:43 SQL Statement is null or not a SELECT - 06:34:43 SQL Statement is null or not a DELETE - 06:34:43 Botany & Plant Biology 2007 - Abstract Search
Unable to connect to database - 06:34:43 Unable to connect to database - 06:34:43 SQL Statement is null or not a SELECT - 06:34:43

Abstract Detail


Genome Evolution

dePamphilis, Claude W. [1], Altman, Naomi [2], Carlson, John [3], Clifton, Sandra [4], Goicoechea, Jose Luis [5], Kudrna, Dave [5], Landherr, Lena [6], Leebens-Mack, James H. [7], Ma, Hong [6], Soltis, Douglas E. [8], Soltis, Pamela S. [9], Wall, P. Kerr [6], Wing, Rod [5].

The Ancestral Angiosperm: Steps toward a genetic and genomic understanding of the origin of flowering plants.

The origin and early diversification of flowering plants had profound impacts on Earth's biota and provided the raw genetic material from which all other angiosperms evolved. The evolution of genomes, genes, regulatory processes, and many specific adaptations in monocots and eudicots cannot be adequately interpreted without a comparative framework firmly rooted with genome sequences from basal angiosperms. However, little is known about the genomes or most genes of the basal-most extant flowering plants, which are our sole surviving links to the earliest angiosperms. Limited EST data, from early flower development in the Floral Genome Project (FGP), provide our only current clues to the gene set present in the Ancestral Angiosperm. These data suggest that the earliest flowering plants had a large and diverse set of genes contributing to the flowering process, and may have undergone a polyploid event just prior to diversification of extant lineages. The Ancestral Angiosperm Genome Project (AAGP) is built around three primary experimental objectives, designed to provide key resources for the development of a comparative framework for all angiosperms: 1) deep transcriptome sequencing from multiple vegetative and reproductive organs of five basal angiosperms and one gymnosperm, 2) BAC library fingerprinting and physical mapping of Amborella, representing the basal-most extant angiosperm lineage, 3) sequencing of Amborella BAC clones, including 20 BACs to be suggested by members of the scientific community. Progress to date includes 1) the completion of BAC fingerprinting and a Phase I Physical Map and paired-end sequencing of ca. 70,000 Amborella BACs, 2) development of simulation tools to guide the design and execution of large-scale transcriptome sequencing involving capillary, 454, and Solexa platforms, 3) a rapidly expanding EST set that allows an increasingly precise view of genes and gene families present in the earliest flowering plants before monocots and eudicots diverged. A public call will be made for suggestions for individual BAC clones to be sequenced from Amborella.


Log in to add this item to your schedule

Related Links:
Floral Genome Project
PlantTribes Gene Family Database
Arizona Genomics Institute
Washington University Genome Sequencing Center


1 - The Pennsylvania State University, Biology, Institute of Molecular Evolutionary Genetics, and The Huck Institutes of the Life Sciences, University Park, PA, 16802, USA
2 - The Pennsylvania State University, Statistics
3 - The Pennsylvania State University, School of Forest Resources and The Huck Institutes of the Life Sciences
4 - Washington University, Genome Sequencing Center
5 - University of Arizona, Arizona Genomics Institute
6 - The Pennsylvania State University, Biology, Institute of Molecular Evolutionary Genetics, and The Huck Institutes of the Life Sciences
7 - University of Georgia, Plant Biology
8 - University of Florida, Department of Botany
9 - University of Florida, Florida Museum of Natural History

Keywords:
Comparative Genomics
genome evolution
HIgh Information Content Fingerprinting
Physical Map
next-generation sequencing.

Presentation Type: Plant Biology Abstract
Session: P
Location: Exhibit Hall (Northeast, Southwest & Southeast)/Hilton
Date: Sunday, July 8th, 2007
Time: 8:00 AM
Number: P40018
Abstract ID:2003


Copyright 2000-2007, Botanical Society of America. All rights