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Abstract Detail


Physiological Section

Darnowski, Douglas [1], Moberly, Stephen [2], Plachno, Bartosz [3].

Triggerplants (Stylidium spp.; Stylidiaceae): A Previously Unrecognized Genus of Carnivorous Plants.

Triggerplants (Stylidium spp.; Stylidiaceae), a genus of over 300 species nearly endemic to Australia, possess glandular hairs on their scapes and on abaxial sides of some flower parts which trap small insects like gnats and midges. While these plants were known for, and named for, a repeatable, rapid, active pollination mechanism, they had not been examined for carnivory. Carnivorous plants are defined as attracting, trapping, digesting, and absorbing prey, and data has been obtained showing that 1) prey are trapped in the wild in numbers comparable to those found for accepted carnivorous plants such as Drosera (on a per unit surface area basis), 2) prey are digested by proteases secreted by the plants and not by surface microorganisms, 3) material is absorbed by the surface of triggerplants. We will include discussion of metabolomic work using 13C-labelled amino acids in area 3).


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Related Links:
International Triggerplant Society


1 - Indiana University Southeast, Department of Biology, 4201 Grant Line Road, New Albany, Indiana, 47150, USA
2 - Indiana University Southeast, Biology, 4201 Grant Line Road, New Albany, IN, 47150, USA
3 - Jagiellonian University, Department of Plant Cytology and Embryology, 52 ul. Grodzka, Krakow, 31-044, Poland

Keywords:
Triggerplant
Stylidium
carnivorous.

Presentation Type: Oral Paper:Papers for Sections
Session: CP52
Location: Stevens 1/Hilton
Date: Wednesday, July 11th, 2007
Time: 1:00 PM
Number: CP52001
Abstract ID:18


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