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Abstract Detail


Economic Botany: Applied Plant Biology

Ellis, Nathanael [1], Rehman, Maqsood [2], Waheed, Omar [1], Stewart, Neil [3], Pires, J. Chris [4].

Estimating the risk of transgene migration from genetically modified Brassica napus to Brassica rapa.

Genetically modified crops can hybridize with related weedy species. For example, transgenic canola (allopolyploid Brassica napus, AACC genomes) can cross with the diploid B. rapa (AA genome) to form hybrids (AAC). Under field conditions, transgenic hybrids can mate with B. rapa to make “superweeds.” One way of minimizing the gene migration is to place transgenes on the unshared C-genome of B. napus. In theory, the C-genome chromosomes are likely to be lost if B. rapa is the recurrent parent in backcrosses. However, the A and C-genomes of B. napus can undergo chromosomal rearrangements that can move a transgene from the “safe” C genome to the A genome. Recent advances in molecular cytogenetics allow us to observe the frequency of homoeologous exchanges and to find safer sites within the B. napus genome to place transgenes. To investigate transgene movement, we crossed three independent genetically modified B. napus with a natural B. rapa to produce F1 hybrids. These F1 hybrids were then backcrossed over three generations to B. rapa as the recurrent parent. To estimate gene migration from transgenic B. napus to B. rapa, each backcross generation (BC1, BC2, BC3) was analyzed for its chromosome number, presence of transgene, germination, and fertility. This study will find “safe” sites in B. napus to place transgenes and offer insight in the mechanisms of crop to weed transgene introgression in B. napus x B. rapa hybrids.


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1 - University of Missouri - Columbia, Biological Sciences, 311 Life Science Center, 1201 Rollins St., Columbia, MO, 65211, U.S.A.
2 - University of Missouri - Columbia, Biological Sciences, 1201 Rollins Road, 311 Life Sciences Center, Columbia, Missouri, 65211, USA
3 - University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Department of Plant Sciences,, Knoxville, TN, 37996
4 - University of Missouri, Biological Sciences, 1201 Rollins Road, 311 Life Sciences Center, Columbia, Missouri, 65211, USA

Keywords:
transgene escape
Brassica
cytogenetics.

Presentation Type: Poster:Posters for Topics
Session: P
Location: Exhibit Hall (Northeast, Southwest & Southeast)/Hilton
Date: Sunday, July 8th, 2007
Time: 8:00 AM
Number: P66003
Abstract ID:1774


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