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Abstract Detail


Comparative Genomics, Development, Physiology and Systematics of the Brassicaceae and Cleomaceae

Hall, Jocelyn [1].

Development and evolution in the Brassicaceae, Cleomaceae, and Capparaceae.

The two closest families to Brassicaceae, Cleomaceae and Capparaceae s.s., are examined from molecular, morphological, and developmental perspectives. I present an update on phylogenetic relationships among the three families based on increased taxon and molecular marker sampling. Specifically, I focus on generic relationships within Cleomaceae, the sister family to Brassicaceae. Both Cleomaceae and Capparaceae display a wide range of floral forms, varying with regards to floral symmetry, organ number, intercalary elongation of receptacle tissue, and the loss of perianth whorls. The floral diversity in these two families is especially remarkable considering how stable the floral form is in over 3000 species of Brassicaceae. Much of this variation is likely attributable to plant-pollinator interactions. I will highlight evolutionary patterns of morphological variation in characteristics important to these interactions, with emphasis on floral symmetry. Developmental patterns relating to this trait will be presented in a phylogenetic framework.


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1 - University of Alberta, Department of Biological Sciences, Room: B 608, Biological Sciences Bldg., Edmonton, Alberta, T6G 2E9, Canada

Keywords:
Cleomaceae
Brassicaceae
floral morphology.

Presentation Type: Symposium or Colloquium Presentation
Session: SY07
Location: Stevens 2/Hilton
Date: Monday, July 9th, 2007
Time: 1:00 PM
Number: SY07001
Abstract ID:1709


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