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Abstract Detail


Conservation Biology

Gitzendanner, Matthew A. [1], Germain-Aubrey, Charlotte [2], Weekley, Carl W. [3], Menges, E.S. [3], Soltis, Douglas E. [1], Soltis, Pamela S. [4].

Microsatellite analysis of in-situ populations and ex-situ seedlings of the Lake Wales Ridge, Florida, USA endemic plant Ziziphus celata (Rhamnaceae).

Ziziphus celata (Rhamnaceae) is one of Florida’s rarest plant species. Endemic to the Lake Wales Ridge, Z. celata is known from only six populations. Previous genetic work indicated that each population was a single clone, a particularly dire situation for a self-incompatible species. Here we use microsatellites to further investigate the genetic patterns in wild populations of Z. celata, as well as conduct paternity analysis of seedlings generated in the ex-situ Center for Plant Conservation gardens located at Historic Bok Sanctuary. Microsatellites were able to resolve four genotypes in one of the subpopulations that previous genetic markers had not detected. This sub-population is the only wild population that has any fruit set, though no recruitment has been observed in the wild. All other populations have a single genotype and appear to be the result of asexual propagation via root shoots. Paternity analysis has been successful at assigning paternal genotypes in a large portion of the seedlings genotyped. Many of these seedlings are now planted in experimental introductions. We will discuss the implications of these results for the prospects of managing this Federally-listed endangered species. In addition we will discuss progress on our efforts to isolate the self-incompatibility locus (S-locus) of Z. celata aimed at providing a molecular tool for rapid mating-type identification.


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1 - University of Florida, Department of Botany, 220 Bartram Hall, P.O. Box 118526, Gainesville, Florida, 32611-8526, USA
2 - University of Florida, Department of Botany, Florida Museum of Natural History, Dicksinson Hall. Museum Road, Gainesville, Fl, 32611, USA
3 - Archbold Biological Station, Plant Ecology Lab, P.O. Box 2057, Lake Placid, Florida, 33862, USA
4 - University of Florida, Florida Museum of Natural History, PO Box 117800, Gainesville, FL, 32611-7800, USA

Keywords:
microsatellites
conservation genetics
paternity
endangered.

Presentation Type: Oral Paper:Papers for Topics
Session: CP02
Location: PDR 4/Hilton
Date: Monday, July 9th, 2007
Time: 9:15 AM
Number: CP02006
Abstract ID:1610


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