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Abstract Detail


Pollination Biology

Goodrich, Katherine R. [1], Raguso, Robert A. [2].

Constructing floral phenotypes: The odor component of floral display in Asimina and Deeringothamnus (Annonaceae).

Floral scent can act as a signal to plant pollinators, visitors and herbivores alike, suggesting that it is shaped by multiple selective pressures, and warrants attention in the fields of botany, plant reproductive ecology and plant physiology. Here we provide a chemical analysis of floral scent in the genera Asimina and Deeringothamnus (Annonaceae), the only Annonaceae occurring exclusively in sub-tropical and temperate habitats. We collected scent from flowers of all species in these two genera using solid phase microextraction (SPME) coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), sampling from female and male stages of floral development. Fermentation volatiles (similar to those of yeast) were found in all four Asimina species with maroon flowers, suggesting a non-random combination of traits associated with the mimicry of rotting fruit. In contrast, hydrocarbons and lilac compounds were common to most Asimina species with white flowers, but scent blends were species-specific, suggesting the potential for odor-mediated flower-constancy. Deeringothamnus pulchellus scent contained large amounts of sweet-smelling compounds such as benzaldehyde and methyl benzoate– all absent or minor components of Asimina floral scents. All of these odors differ markedly from the fruity-ester dominated scents of tropical, thermogenic Annona and related genera, and suggest a transition to different reproductive strategies associated with temperate pollinator faunas.


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1 - University of South Carolina, Department of Biological Sciences, 700 Sumter St, Columbia, SC, 29208, USA
2 - University of South Carolina, Department of Biological Sciences, Coker Life Sciences Building, 700 Sumter St., Columbia, South Carolina, 29208, USA

Keywords:
pollination syndromes
sapromyophily
cantharophily
Floral scent.

Presentation Type: Oral Paper:Papers for Topics
Session: CP37
Location: Lake Ontario/Hilton
Date: Tuesday, July 10th, 2007
Time: 5:15 PM
Number: CP37006
Abstract ID:1415


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