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Abstract Detail


Population Genetics

Fehlberg, Shannon D. [1], Ford, Kristen A. [1], Ungerer, Mark C. [1], Ferguson, Carolyn J. [2].

Development, transferability, and application of microsatellite markers in Phlox (Polemoniaceae).

In order to study diversification and microevolution in Phlox, we developed several polymorphic microsatellite loci. Genomic libraries enriched for microsatellites were developed using restriction digests of genomic DNA, ligation of fragments to SNX linkers, and recovery of fragments that had been hybridized to biotinylated oligos, following Hamilton et al. (1999) and Glenn and Schable (2005). In 20 individuals of P. pilosa from a single population, the average number of alleles per locus was 10.0 ± 5.1, and average observed and expected heterozygosities were 0.611 ± 0.234 and 0.769 ± 0.170, respectively. Most of these markers amplified successfully in 11 additional species of Phlox (representing a broad diversity of the genus), and some also amplified in more distantly related members of the Polemoniaceae. Studies currently underway applying these markers to investigate evolutionary processes in this important study system are briefly discussed.


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1 - Kansas State University, Division of Biology, Ackert Hall, Manhattan, KS, 66502, USA
2 - Kansas State University, Division of Biology, Ackert Hall, Manhattan, Kansas, 66506-4901, USA

Keywords:
Polemoniaceae
microsatellites
Phlox.

Presentation Type: Poster:Posters for Topics
Session: P
Location: Exhibit Hall (Northeast, Southwest & Southeast)/Hilton
Date: Sunday, July 8th, 2007
Time: 8:00 AM
Number: P76009
Abstract ID:1281


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