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Abstract Detail


A Symposium in Honor of Sherwin Carlquist

Zona, Scott [1].

Long-Distance Dispersal and the Loss of Dispersibility.

As a result of his studies of plants inhabiting oceanic islands, Sherwin Carlquist became an advocate of long-distance dispersal. Vicariance biogeography rose to dominance in the late 20th Century, overshadowing the significance of long-distance dispersal as a legitimate biological process worthy of scientific study. Molecular phylogenies are now breathing new life into dispersal hypotheses, sometimes supporting unexpected dispersal histories. The floras of oceanic islands continue to offer the best evidence for the importance of long-distance dispersal, as they can be explained no other way. From Carlquist’s observations of the diaspores of Hawaiian plants, he formulated his theory of loss of dispersibility, which stated that island endemics, themselves descendants of plants that arrived via long-distance dispersal, have less dispersal capacity. Molecular evidence for long-distance dispersal is now available for numerous island lineages, and the loss of dispersibility is demonstrated in many cases.


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1 - Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden, 11935 Old Cutler Rd., Coral Gables, Miami, Florida, 33156-4299

Keywords:
dispersal
Carlquist
loss of dispersibility.

Presentation Type: Symposium or Colloquium Presentation
Session: SY10
Location: Continental B/Hilton
Date: Tuesday, July 10th, 2007
Time: 10:45 AM
Number: SY10005
Abstract ID:1138


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