Unable to connect to database - 22:02:14 Unable to connect to database - 22:02:14 SQL Statement is null or not a SELECT - 22:02:14 SQL Statement is null or not a DELETE - 22:02:14 Botany & Plant Biology 2007 - Abstract Search
Unable to connect to database - 22:02:14 Unable to connect to database - 22:02:14 SQL Statement is null or not a SELECT - 22:02:14

Abstract Detail


Education & Outreach

O'Brien, Terry [1], Egner, Tammy [2].

Usage of Plants in Teaching Biological Principles in Secondary School Education.

Botanists have expressed concern over the dwindling recognition and emphasis of plants that currently exists in the fields of education and research. To ascertain if these claims pertain to high schools in the State of New Jersey, a survey of the frequency of usage of plant for teaching 10 biological principles was randomly distributed to secondary school biology teachers in New Jersey. Results from 80 respondents showed that on average, plants are used as examples in teaching 66% of these biological principles. The primary rationale cited by teachers for low or non-usage of plants was that they preferred animals as teaching examples. Underlying factors that explain this lack of plant emphasis include course requirements of teacher certification, the current biology teaching trends in our classrooms, and the recognition and funding opportunities of plant science. Our recommendations include requiring a botany course for all college students in science teaching programs, involving botanical societies in educational collaborations and promoting a greater public awareness of research in plant science.


Log in to add this item to your schedule

1 - Rowan University, Department of Biological Sciences, Glassboro, New Jersey, 08028-1702, USA
2 - Rowan University, Dept. of Teacher Education, Glassboro, NJ, 08028, U.S.A.

Keywords:
education
New Jersey.

Presentation Type: Plant Biology Abstract
Session: P
Location: Exhibit Hall (Northeast, Southwest & Southeast)/Hilton
Date: Sunday, July 8th, 2007
Time: 8:00 AM
Number: P46010
Abstract ID:1024


Copyright 2000-2007, Botanical Society of America. All rights