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Abstract Detail


Evolution of Flower Development: from Phenotypes to Genes

Zachgo, Sabine [1], Busch, Andrea [2].

Shaping the beauty: Analysis of petal symmetry evolution in the Brassicaceae.

During the evolution of the Angiosperms, co-evolution of floral shape and pollinators yielded in the formation of a large diversity of floral organs, especially affecting floral symmetry in adaptation to pollinators. Actinomorphic flowers with symmetrical organs are considered to present the ancestral floral stage. Zygomorphic flowers show a bilateral organ symmetry and likely represent a derived character that has evolved several times independently during flower evolution. The Brassicaceae comprise over 350 genera and the overwhelming majority of its species form four equally sized petals. However, in the genus Iberis, species such as Iberis amara form flowers with small abaxial and large adaxial petals, giving the flower a zygomorphic appearance. We report expression data and functional experiments exploring if homologs of the TCP transcritption factor CYCLOIDEA, known to control floral zygomorphy in Antirrhinum, could have been recruited to contribute to the establishment of zygomorphic petals in the Brassicaceae.


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1 - Max-Planck-Institut für Züchtungsforschung, Carl-von-Linné Weg 10, D-50829 Köln
2 - Max-Planck-Institut für Züchtungsforschung, Carl-von-Linné Weg 10, Köln, D-50829, Germany

Keywords:
Brassicaceae
symmetry
floral evolution
TCP.

Presentation Type: Symposium or Colloquium Presentation
Session: SY17
Location: Stevens 4/Hilton
Date: Wednesday, July 11th, 2007
Time: 11:00 AM
Number: SY17005
Abstract ID:1018


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